Order of the Good Write

That Magic Feeling When the Words Flow. A Blog by Debi Rotmil


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Writing is all “Up in the Air”

“Writers and travelers alike do their best work when they don’t know what they’re looking for; disorientation requires problem-solving, and a new landscape holds secrets still.” ~Nathan Heller, The New Yorker Magazine, February 1, 2016 issue.

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A little morsel of wisdom from Nathan Heller, who writes an incredibly fascinating article about the culture of airports and the future of commercial flight. He sites Christopher Shaberg’s book, “The End of Airports” as a thesis on how travel by air has become more commerce and retail rather than experience and excitement. It’s beautifully written and provides some thought into the strange hermetically sealed, other-world air passengers find themselves in while committed to the tightly controlled world of flight.

I highly recommend this article, not just for the subject matter, but as a sample of truly tight, well organized and fluid writing. The expression, the structure, the fluidity of words and thought is inspiring.

If you don’t have a subscription to the New Yorker Magazine, you might be allowed ten free viewings.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/02/01/air-head

The New Yorker. The magazine is either your holy grail, your bible or your enemy; yet, there’s treasure in them thar pages.

Happy Sunday!

 


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“Moving On” Again

nora ephron

“When you give up your apartment in New York and move to another city, New York becomes the worst version of itself. Someone I know once wisely said that the expression “It’s a nice place to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there” is completely wrong where New York is concerned; the opposite is true. New York is a very livable city. But when you move away and become a visitor the city seems to turn against you. It’s much more expensive (because you have to eat all your meals out and pay for a place to sleep) and more unfriendly. Things change in New York; things change all the time. You don’t mind this when you live here; it’s part of the caffeinated romance of the city that never sleeps. But when you leave you experience change as a betrayal. You walk up Third Avenue planning to buy a brownie at a bakery you’ve always been loyal to, and the bakery’s gone. Your dry cleaner moves to Florida; your dentist retires; the lady who made the pies on West Fourth Street vanishes; the maitre d’ at P.J. Clarke’s quits , and you realize you’re going to have to start from scratch tipping your way into the heart of the cold, chic young woman now at the door. You’ve turned your back for only a moment, and suddenly everything’s different. You were an insider, a native, a subway traveler, a purveyor of tips into the good stuff, and now you’re just another frequent flyer, stuck in a taxi on the Grand Central Parkway as you wing in and out of LaGuardia. Meanwhile, you read that Manhattan rents are going up, they’re climbing higher, they’ve reached the stratosphere. It seems that the moment you left town they put up a wall around the place, and you will never manage to vault over it and get back into the city again.”

-Excerpt from ‘New Yorker’ article by Nora Ephron, “Moving On”, June 5, 2006.

Yes. Every word of it.